<script async src="//pagead2.googlesyndication.com/pagead/js/adsbygoogle.js"></script><!-- [et_pb_line_break_holder] --><!-- Jazz top leaderboard responsive --><!-- [et_pb_line_break_holder] --><ins class="adsbygoogle"<!-- [et_pb_line_break_holder] --> style="display:block"<!-- [et_pb_line_break_holder] --> data-ad-client="ca-pub-6806835162578064"<!-- [et_pb_line_break_holder] --> data-ad-slot="6215673776"<!-- [et_pb_line_break_holder] --> data-ad-format="auto"></ins><!-- [et_pb_line_break_holder] --><script><!-- [et_pb_line_break_holder] -->(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({});<!-- [et_pb_line_break_holder] --></script>

Humoresque No. 7

Art Tatum

<script async src="//pagead2.googlesyndication.com/pagead/js/adsbygoogle.js"></script><!-- [et_pb_line_break_holder] --><!-- jazzonthetube (large rect) --><!-- [et_pb_line_break_holder] --><ins class="adsbygoogle"<!-- [et_pb_line_break_holder] --> style="display:inline-block;width:336px;height:280px"<!-- [et_pb_line_break_holder] --> data-ad-client="ca-pub-6806835162578064"<!-- [et_pb_line_break_holder] --> data-ad-slot="5011165844"></ins><!-- [et_pb_line_break_holder] --><script><!-- [et_pb_line_break_holder] -->(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({});<!-- [et_pb_line_break_holder] --></script>
<script async src="//pagead2.googlesyndication.com/pagead/js/adsbygoogle.js"></script><!-- [et_pb_line_break_holder] --><!-- Jazz Bottom leaderboard --><!-- [et_pb_line_break_holder] --><ins class="adsbygoogle"<!-- [et_pb_line_break_holder] --> style="display:block"<!-- [et_pb_line_break_holder] --> data-ad-client="ca-pub-6806835162578064"<!-- [et_pb_line_break_holder] --> data-ad-slot="5537913431"<!-- [et_pb_line_break_holder] --> data-ad-format="auto"></ins><!-- [et_pb_line_break_holder] --><script><!-- [et_pb_line_break_holder] -->(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({});<!-- [et_pb_line_break_holder] --></script>

October 13, 1909 – November 5, 1956

Jazz pianist Art Tatum had conceptions about the way music should be played as sharp as his razor-sharp reflexes. Although his eyesight was nearly nonexistent, particularly in early life, his ability to name and hold a note was impeccable.

His rag-time inclinations and dedication caused his considerable popularity to wane somewhat as the jazz world became enamored with the bebop sound.